Pittenweem Library reviews

Review: The Sixteen Trees of the Somme by Lars Mytting

Edvard, the first person narrator, who has grown up on a remote Norwegian farmstead, sets off on a voyage in search of the truth about what happened to his parents, who died in France when he was three. The backdrop to this voyage embraces different places and times, as the beautifully constructed plot weaves its way across the twentieth century.

Comments Off on Review: The Sixteen Trees of the Somme by Lars Mytting

Review: Tales from the East Neuk, edited by William McNaughton

Tales from the East Neuk is a fascinating compendium (264 pages) of fishermen’s tales, losses at sea, wartime exploits, comic anecdotes, family histories and articles and photos of historic buildings, mostly in Pittenweem.

Comments Off on Review: Tales from the East Neuk, edited by William McNaughton

Review: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is part biography, part science writing. It was published in 2010 and garnered an array of awards. Henrietta Lacks was a young vivacious African-American tobacco farmer, a mother of five, who died in poverty in 1951 and was buried in an unmarked grave.

Comments Off on Review: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Review: Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson

Meet Me at the Museum, a novel in the form of letters, published in 2018. It was Anne Youngson’s first novel. Written when she was already 73 years old, it became an international bestseller – so for those of you out there with literary ambitions, it’s never too late!

Comments Off on Review: Meet Me at the Museum by Anne Youngson

Review: The novels of Raymond Chandler

Raymond Chandler started writing after being sacked from his position as a top executive in an oil company for drunkenness and failing to turn up for work. His first stories were published in the 1930s in the pulp magazine Black Mask. In his own words, ‘I spent five months over an 18,000 word novelette and sold it for $180. After that I never looked back, although I had a good many uneasy periods looking forward.’ We have five of his novels in the library.

Comments Off on Review: The novels of Raymond Chandler

Review: t Hooge Nest by Roxane van Iperen

When we took over the library from the Fife Cultural Trust in 2017 we found the vast majority of books were by British and American writers and have since made a point of adding titles in translation – most of these are fiction but we welcome non-fiction as well. 

The Sisters of Auschwitz falls into that category, having appeared first in Dutch as 't Hooge Nest' – The High Nest being the name of the house where two Jewish sisters, at enormous risk to themselves, hid people fleeing from the Nazis during the Occupation. The main focus of the book is their resistance work – only the last part relates to the time they spent in Auschwitz after they were captured.

Comments Off on Review: t Hooge Nest by Roxane van Iperen

Review: Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot, by John Lloyd

We are always pleased to feature local writers, and this review of the life and work of John Lloyd will be of particular interest to people who know him from his Anstruther days and have followed his career as foreign correspondent, journalist and editor.

Comments Off on Review: Should Auld Acquaintance Be Forgot, by John Lloyd

Review: Scotland – Her Story by Rosemary Goring

Rosemary Goring’s Scotland: Her Story offers a new perspective on Scotland’s history drawn from records, diaries and memoirs that tell the story of the nation through the lives of women down the centuries.

Comments Off on Review: Scotland – Her Story by Rosemary Goring

Review: The novels of Lissa Evans and Scotland

Lissa Evans’s novels sound like ideal summer reading. According to The Independent’s reviewer she is ‘that rarest of gems amongst writers: not just a real storyteller, but one who makes the entire process seem effortlessly simple’.

Comments Off on Review: The novels of Lissa Evans and Scotland

Review: American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins

Jeanine Cummins has attracted a huge amount of controversy in the States for her latest novel. Despite her Irish / Puerto Rican heritage, as Pat states in her review, Cummins has been heavily criticised to the extent that the book’s publishers cancelled her book tour earlier this year because of fears for her safety.

Comments Off on Review: American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins